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20050628	Continuing the work on the ARM translation engine. end_of_page
		works. Experimenting with load/store translation caches
		(virtual -> physical -> host).
20050629	More ARM stuff (memory access translation cache, mostly). This
		might break a lot of stuff elsewhere, probably some MIPS-
		related translation things.
20050630	Many load/stores are now automatically generated and included
		into cpu_arm_instr.c; 1024 functions in total (!).
		Fixes based on feedback from Alec Voropay: only print 8 hex
		digits instead of 16 in some cases when emulating 32-bit
		machines; similar 8 vs 16 digit fix for breakpoint addresses;
		4Kc has 16 TLB entries, not 48; the MIPS config select1
		register is now printed with "reg ,0".
		Also changing many other occurances of 16 vs 8 digit output.
		Adding cache associativity fields to mips_cpu_types.h; updating
		some other cache fields; making the output of
		mips_cpu_dumpinfo() look nicer.
		Generalizing the bintrans stuff for device accesses to also
		work with the new translation system. (This might also break
		some MIPS things.)
		Adding multi-load/store instructions to the ARM disassembler
		and the translator, and some optimizations of various kinds.
20050701	Adding a simple dev_disk (it can read/write sectors from
		disk images).
20050712	Adding dev_ether (a simple ethernet send/receive device).
		Debugger command "ninstrs" for toggling show_nr_of_instructions
		during runtime.
		Removing the framebuffer logo.
20050713	Continuing on dev_ether.
		Adding a dummy cpu_alpha (again).
20050714	More work on cpu_alpha.
20050715	More work on cpu_alpha. Many instructions work, enough to run
		a simple framebuffer fill test (similar to the ARM test).
20050716	More Alpha stuff.
20050717	Minor updates (Alpha stuff).
20050718	Minor updates (Alpha stuff).
20050719	Generalizing some Alpha instructions.
20050720	More Alpha-related updates.
20050721	Continuing on cpu_alpha. Importing rpb.h from NetBSD/alpha.
20050722	Alpha-related updates: userland stuff (Hello World using
		write() compiled statically for FreeBSD/Alpha runs fine), and
		more instructions are now implemented.
20050723	Fixing ldq_u and stq_u.
		Adding more instructions (conditional moves, masks, extracts,
		shifts).
20050724	More FreeBSD/Alpha userland stuff, and adding some more
		instructions (inserts).
20050725	Continuing on the Alpha stuff. (Adding dummy ldt/stt.)
		Adding a -A command line option to turn off alignment checks
		in some cases (for translated code).
		Trying to remove the old bintrans code which updated the pc
		and nr_of_executed_instructions for every instruction.
20050726	Making another attempt att removing the pc/nr of instructions
		code. This time it worked, huge performance increase for
		artificial test code, but performance loss for real-world
		code :-( so I'm scrapping that code for now.
		Tiny performance increase on Alpha (by using ret instead of
		jmp, to play nice with the Alpha's branch prediction) for the
		old MIPS bintrans backend.
20050727	Various minor fixes and cleanups.
20050728	Switching from a 2-level virtual to host/physical translation
		system for ARM emulation, to a 1-level translation.
		Trying to switch from 2-level to 1-level for the MIPS bintrans
		system as well (Alpha only, so far), but there is at least one
		problem: caches and/or how they work with device mappings.
20050730	Doing the 2-level to 1-level conversion for the i386 backend.
		The cache/device bug is still there for R2K/3K :(
		Various other minor updates (Malta etc).
		The mc146818 clock now updates the UIP bit in a way which works
		better with Linux for at least sgimips and Malta emulation.
		Beginning the work on refactoring the dyntrans system.
20050731	Continuing the dyntrans refactoring.
		Fixing a small but serious host alignment bug in memory_rw.
		Adding support for big-endian load/stores to the i386 bintrans
		backend.
		Another minor i386 bintrans backend update: stores from the
		zero register are now one (or two) loads shorter.
		The slt and sltu instructions were incorrectly implemented for
		the i386 backend; only using them for 32-bit mode for now.
20050801	Continuing the dyntrans refactoring.
		Cleanup of the ns16550 serial controller (removing unnecessary
		code).
		Bugfix (memory corruption bug) in dev_gt, and a patch/hack from
		Alec Voropay for Linux/Malta.
20050802	More cleanup/refactoring of the dyntrans subsystem: adding
		phys_page pointers to the lookup tables, for quick jumps
		between translated pages.
		Better fix for the ns16550 device (but still no real FIFO
		functionality).
		Converting cpu_ppc to the new dyntrans system. This means that
		I will have to start from scratch with implementing each
		instruction, and figure out how to implement dual 64/32-bit
		modes etc.
		Removing the URISC CPU family, because it was useless.
20050803	When selecting a machine type, the main type can now be omitted
		if the subtype name is unique. (I.e. -E can be omitted.)
		Fixing a dyntrans/device update bug. (Writes to offset 0 of
		a device could sometimes go unnoticed.)
		Adding an experimental "instruction combination" hack for
		ARM for memset-like byte fill loops.
20050804	Minor progress on cpu_alpha and related things.
		Finally fixing the MIPS dmult/dmultu bugs.
		Fixing some minor TODOs.
20050805	Generalizing the 8259 PIC. It now also works with Cobalt
		and evbmips emulation, in addition to the x86 hack.
		Finally converting the ns16550 device to use devinit.
		Continuing the work on the dyntrans system. Thinking about
		how to add breakpoints.
20050806	More dyntrans updates. Breakpoints seem to work now.
20050807	Minor updates: cpu_alpha and related things; removing
		dev_malta (as it isn't used any more).
		Dyntrans: working on general "show trace tree" support.
		The trace tree stuff now works with both the old MIPS code and
		with newer dyntrans modes. :)
		Continuing on Alpha-related stuff (trying to get *BSD to boot
		a bit further, adding more instructions, etc).
20050808	Adding a dummy IA64 cpu family, and continuing the refactoring
		of the dyntrans system.
		Removing the regression test stuff, because it was more or
		less useless.
		Adding loadlinked/storeconditional type instructions to the
		Alpha emulation. (Needed for Linux/alpha. Not very well tested
		yet.)
20050809	The function call trace tree now prints a per-function nr of
		arguments. (Semi-meaningless, since that data isn't read yet
		from the ELFs; some hardcoded symbols such as memcpy() and
		strlen() work fine, though.)
		More dyntrans refactoring; taking out more of the things that
		are common to all cpu families.
20050810	Working on adding support for "dual mode" for PPC dyntrans
		(i.e. both 64-bit and 32-bit modes).
		(Re)adding some simple PPC instructions.
20050811	Adding a dummy M68K cpu family. The dyntrans system isn't ready
		for variable-length ISAs yet, so it's completely bogus so far.
		Re-adding more PPC instructions.
		Adding a hack to src/file.c which allows OpenBSD/mac68k a.out
		kernels to be loaded.
		Beginning to add PPC loads/stores. So far they only work in
		32-bit mode.
20050812	The configure file option "add_remote" now accepts symbolic
		host names, in addition to numeric IPv4 addresses.
		Re-adding more PPC instructions.
20050814	Continuing to port back more PPC instructions.
		Found and fixed the cache/device write-update bug for 32-bit
		MIPS bintrans. :-)
		Triggered a really weird and annoying bug in Compaq's C
		compiler; ccc sometimes outputs code which loads from an
		address _before_ checking whether the pointer was NULL or not.
		(I'm not sure how to handle this problem.)
20050815	Removing all of the old x86 instruction execution code; adding
		a new (dummy) dyntrans module for x86.
		Taking the first steps to extend the dyntrans system to support
		variable-length instructions.
		Slowly preparing for the next release.
20050816	Adding a dummy SPARC cpu module.
		Minor updates (documentation etc) for the release.

==============  RELEASE 0.3.5  ==============


1 dpavlin 12 <html><head><title>Gavare's eXperimental Emulator:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Introduction</title>
2     <meta name="robots" content="noarchive,nofollow,noindex"></head>
3 dpavlin 4 <body bgcolor="#f8f8f8" text="#000000" link="#4040f0" vlink="#404040" alink="#ff0000">
4     <table border=0 width=100% bgcolor="#d0d0d0"><tr>
5     <td width=100% align=center valign=center><table border=0 width=100%><tr>
6     <td align="left" valign=center bgcolor="#d0efff"><font color="#6060e0" size="6">
7 dpavlin 12 <b>Gavare's eXperimental Emulator:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</b></font>
8 dpavlin 4 <font color="#000000" size="6"><b>Introduction</b>
9     </font></td></tr></table></td></tr></table><p>
10 dpavlin 2
11     <!--
12    
13 dpavlin 12 $Id: intro.html,v 1.61 2005/08/16 05:15:24 debug Exp $
14 dpavlin 2
15     Copyright (C) 2003-2005 Anders Gavare. All rights reserved.
16    
17     Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
18     modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:
19    
20     1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
21     notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
22     2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
23     notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
24     documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
25     3. The name of the author may not be used to endorse or promote products
26     derived from this software without specific prior written permission.
27    
28     THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE AUTHOR AND CONTRIBUTORS ``AS IS'' AND
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30     IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE
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32     FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL
33     DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS
34     OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION)
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41    
42     <a href="./">Back to the index</a>
43    
44     <p><br>
45     <h2>Introduction</h2>
46    
47     <p>
48     <ul>
49     <li><a href="#overview">Overview</a>
50 dpavlin 4 <li><a href="#free">Is GXemul Free software?</a>
51 dpavlin 2 <li><a href="#build">How to compile/build the emulator</a>
52 dpavlin 6 <li><a href="#run">How to run the emulator</a>
53 dpavlin 2 <li><a href="#cpus">Which CPU types does GXemul emulate?</a>
54     <li><a href="#accuracy">Emulation accuracy</a>
55     <li><a href="#emulmodes">Which machines does GXemul emulate?</a>
56 dpavlin 10 <li><a href="#guestos">Which guest OSes are possible to run in GXemul?</a>
57 dpavlin 2 </ul>
58    
59    
60    
61    
62    
63     <p><br>
64     <a name="overview"></a>
65     <h3>Overview:</h3>
66    
67 dpavlin 10 GXemul is an experimental instruction-level machine emulator. It can be
68 dpavlin 12 used to run binary code for MIPS-based machines, regardless of host
69     platform. Several emulation modes are available. For some modes,
70 dpavlin 10 processors and surrounding hardware components are emulated well enough to
71     let unmodified operating systems run as if they were running on a real
72     machine.
73 dpavlin 2
74 dpavlin 12 <p>(Non-MIPS emulation modes are also under development, but so far none
75     of those modes has reached the completeness required to run unmodified
76     operating systems.)
77    
78 dpavlin 10 <p>Devices and CPUs are not simulated with 100% accuracy. They are only
79     ``faked'' well enough to make operating systems (e.g. NetBSD) run without
80 dpavlin 6 complaining too much. Still, the emulator could be of interest for
81     academic research and experiments, such as when learning how to write
82 dpavlin 4 operating system code.
83 dpavlin 2
84 dpavlin 10 <p>The emulator is written in C, does not depend on external libraries
85     (except X11, but that is optional), and should compile and run on most
86 dpavlin 12 Unix-like systems. If it doesn't, then that is a bug.
87 dpavlin 2
88 dpavlin 10 <p>The emulator contains code which tries to emulate the workings of CPUs
89     and surrounding hardware found in real machines, but it does not contain
90     any ROM code. You will need some form of program (in binary form) to run
91     in the emulator. For many emulation modes, PROM calls are handled by the
92 dpavlin 2 emulator itself, so you do not need to use any ROM image at all.
93    
94 dpavlin 10 <p>You can use pre-compiled kernels (for example NetBSD kernels, or
95     Linux), or other programs that are in binary format, and in some cases
96     even actual ROM images. A couple of different file formats are supported
97     (ELF, a.out, ECOFF, SREC, and raw binaries).
98 dpavlin 2
99 dpavlin 10 <p>If you do not have a kernel as a separate file, but you have a bootable
100 dpavlin 6 disk image, then it is sometimes possible to boot directly from that
101     image. (This works for example with DECstation emulation, or when booting
102     from ISO9660 CDROM images.)
103 dpavlin 2
104    
105    
106    
107 dpavlin 6
108    
109 dpavlin 10
110    
111 dpavlin 2 <p><br>
112     <a name="free"></a>
113 dpavlin 4 <h3>Is GXemul Free software?</h3>
114 dpavlin 2
115 dpavlin 6 Yes. I have released GXemul under a Free license. The code in GXemul is
116     Copyrighted software, it is <i>not</i> public domain. (If this is
117     confusing to you, you might want to read up on the definitions of the
118     four freedoms associated with Free software, <a
119     href="http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-sw.html">http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-sw.html</a>.)
120 dpavlin 2
121 dpavlin 12 <p>The code I have written is released under a 3-clause BSD-style license
122     (or "revised BSD-style" if one wants to use <a
123     href="http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/bsd.html">GNU jargon</a>). Apart from
124     the code I have written, some files are copied from other sources such as
125     NetBSD, for example header files containing symbolic names of bitfields in
126     device registers. They are also covered by similar licenses, but with some
127     additional clauses. The main point, however, is that the licenses require
128     that the original Copyright and license terms are included when you make a
129     copy or modification.
130 dpavlin 2
131 dpavlin 12 <p>If you plan to redistribute GXemul <i>without</i> supplying the source
132     code, then you need to comply with each individual source file some other
133     way, for example by writing additional documentation containing copyright
134     notes. I have not done this, since I do not plan on making distributions
135     without source code. You need to check all individual files for details.
136     The "easiest way out" if you plan to redistribute code from GXemul is, of
137     course, to let it remain open source and simply supply the source code.
138 dpavlin 2
139 dpavlin 12 <p>(If a stable release of GXemul is packaged into binary form, and it is
140     obvious which version of GXemul was used to build the package, then it can
141     be argued that the source code is available, just not in that specific
142     package. Common sense should be used in this case, and not pedanticism.)
143 dpavlin 2
144    
145    
146    
147 dpavlin 12
148    
149    
150 dpavlin 2 <p><br>
151     <a name="build"></a>
152     <h3>How to compile/build the emulator:</h3>
153    
154     Uncompress the .tar.gz distribution file, and run
155     <pre>
156     $ <b>./configure</b>
157     $ <b>make</b>
158     </pre>
159    
160 dpavlin 12 <p>This should work on most Unix-like systems. If it doesn't, then
161 dpavlin 2 mail me a bug report.
162    
163 dpavlin 12 <p>The emulator's performance is highly dependent on both runtime settings
164 dpavlin 2 and on compiler settings, so you might want to experiment with different
165 dpavlin 12 CC and CFLAGS environment variable values. For example, on a modern PC,
166 dpavlin 2 you could try the following:
167 dpavlin 12 <p><pre>
168     $ <b>CFLAGS="-mcpu=pentium4 -O3" ./configure</b>
169     $ <b>make</b>
170 dpavlin 2 </pre>
171    
172    
173 dpavlin 6
174    
175    
176    
177    
178     <p><br>
179     <a name="run"></a>
180     <h3>How to run the emulator:</h3>
181    
182     Once you have built GXemul, running it should be rather straight-forward.
183     Running <tt><b>gxemul</b></tt> without arguments (or with the
184     <b><tt>-h</tt></b> or <b><tt>-H</tt></b> command line options) will
185     display a help message.
186    
187 dpavlin 2 <p>
188 dpavlin 6 To get some ideas about what is possible to run in the emulator, please
189     read the section about <a href="guestoses.html">installing "guest"
190     operating systems</a>. If you are interested in using the emulator to
191     develop code on your own, then you should also read the section about
192     <a href="experiments.html#hello">Hello World</a>.
193    
194     <p>
195 dpavlin 2 To exit the emulator, type CTRL-C to enter the
196 dpavlin 6 single-step debugger, and then type <tt><b>quit</b></tt>.
197 dpavlin 2
198 dpavlin 4 <p>
199     If you are starting an emulation by entering settings directly on the
200 dpavlin 6 command line, and you are not using the <tt><b>-x</b></tt> option, then all
201 dpavlin 4 terminal input and output will go to the main controlling terminal.
202     CTRL-C is used to break into the debugger, so in order to send CTRL-C to
203     the running (emulated) program, you may use CTRL-B.
204 dpavlin 6 (This should be a reasonable compromise to allow the emulator to be usable
205     even on systems without X Windows.)
206 dpavlin 2
207 dpavlin 4 <p>
208 dpavlin 6 There is no way to send an actual CTRL-B to the emulated program, when
209     typing in the main controlling terminal window. The solution is to either
210     use <a href="configfiles.html">configuration files</a>, or use
211     <tt><b>-x</b></tt>. Both these solutions cause new xterms to be opened for
212     each emulated serial port that is written to. CTRL-B and CTRL-C both have
213     their original meaning in those xterm windows.
214 dpavlin 2
215    
216    
217    
218 dpavlin 4
219 dpavlin 2 <p><br>
220     <a name="cpus"></a>
221     <h3>Which CPU types does GXemul emulate?</h3>
222    
223     <h4>MIPS:</h4>
224    
225 dpavlin 6 Emulation of R4000, which is a 64-bit CPU, was my initial goal.
226     R2000/R3000-like CPUs (32-bit), R1x000, and generic MIPS32/MIPS64-style
227     CPUs are also emulated, and are hopefully almost as stable as the R4000
228     emulation.
229 dpavlin 2
230 dpavlin 12 <p>I have written an experimental dynamic binary translation subsystem.
231 dpavlin 2 This gives higher total performance than interpreting one instruction at a
232 dpavlin 12 time and executing it. (If you wish to disable bintrans, add <b>-B</b> to
233     the command line.)
234 dpavlin 2
235    
236 dpavlin 10 <h4>Other CPU types:</h4>
237 dpavlin 2
238 dpavlin 10 Some other CPU architectures can also be partially emulated. These are not
239     working well enough yet to run guest operating systems.
240 dpavlin 2
241 dpavlin 6
242 dpavlin 2
243    
244    
245    
246     <p><br>
247     <a name="accuracy"></a>
248     <h3>Emulation accuracy:</h3>
249    
250 dpavlin 6 GXemul is an instruction-level emulator; things that would happen in
251 dpavlin 2 several steps within a real CPU are not taken into account (eg. pipe-line
252 dpavlin 6 stalls or out-of-order execution). Still, instruction-level accuracy seems
253     to be enough to be able to run complete guest operating systems inside the
254 dpavlin 2 emulator.
255    
256 dpavlin 12 <p>Caches are by default not emulated. In some cases, the existance of
257     caches is "faked" to let operating systems think that they are there.
258     (There is some old code for R2000/R3000 caches, but it has probably
259     suffered from bitrot by now.)
260 dpavlin 2
261 dpavlin 12 <p>The emulator is <i>not</i> timing-accurate. It can be run in a
262     "deterministic" mode, <tt><b>-D</b></tt>. The meaning of deterministic is
263     simply that running two emulations with the same settings will result in
264     identical runs. Obviously, this requires that no user interaction is
265     taking place, and that clock speeds are fixed with the <tt><b>-I</b></tt>
266     option. (Deterministic in this case does <i>not</i> mean that the
267     emulation will be identical to some actual real-world machine.)
268 dpavlin 2
269    
270    
271 dpavlin 6
272    
273 dpavlin 2 <p><br>
274     <a name="emulmodes"></a>
275     <h3>Which machines does GXemul emulate?</h3>
276    
277 dpavlin 4 A few different machine types are emulated. The following machine types
278     are emulated well enough to run at least one "guest OS":
279 dpavlin 2
280     <p>
281     <ul>
282 dpavlin 4 <li><b>DECstation 5000/200</b>&nbsp;&nbsp;("3max")
283     <br>Serial controller (including keyboard and mouse), ethernet,
284     SCSI, and graphical framebuffers.
285 dpavlin 2 <p>
286     <li><b>Acer Pica-61</b>&nbsp;&nbsp;(an ARC machine)
287 dpavlin 4 <br>Serial controller, "VGA" text console, and SCSI.
288 dpavlin 2 <p>
289     <li><b>NEC MobilePro 770, 780, 800, and 880</b>&nbsp;&nbsp;(HPCmips machines)
290 dpavlin 4 <br>Framebuffer, keyboard, and a PCMCIA IDE controller.
291     <p>
292     <li><b>Cobalt</b>
293     <br>Serial controller and PCI IDE.
294 dpavlin 10 <p>
295     <li><b>Malta (evbmips)</b>
296     <br>Serial controller and PCI IDE.
297     <p>
298     <li><b>SGI O2 ("IP32")</b>
299     <br>Serial controller and ethernet.&nbsp;&nbsp;<small>(Enough for
300     root-on-nfs, but not for disk boot.)</small>
301 dpavlin 2 </ul>
302    
303 dpavlin 10 <p>There is code in GXemul for emulation of many other machine types; the
304     degree to which these work range from almost being able to run a complete
305     OS, to almost completely unsupported (perhaps just enough support to
306     output a few boot messages via serial console).
307 dpavlin 2
308 dpavlin 10 <p>In addition to emulating real machines, there is also a "test-machine".
309     A test-machine consists of one or more CPUs and a few experimental devices
310     such as:
311 dpavlin 2
312     <p>
313     <ul>
314     <li>a console I/O device (putchar() and getchar()...)
315     <li>an inter-processor communication device, for SMP experiments
316     <li>a very simple linear framebuffer device (for graphics output)
317 dpavlin 12 <li>a simple SCSI disk controller
318     <li>a simple ethernet controller
319 dpavlin 2 </ul>
320    
321 dpavlin 10 <p>This mode is useful if you wish to run experimental code, but do not
322 dpavlin 2 wish to target any specific real-world machine type, for example for
323     educational purposes.
324    
325 dpavlin 10 <p>You can read more about these experimental devices <a
326     href="experiments.html#expdevices">here</a>.
327 dpavlin 2
328    
329    
330    
331    
332    
333    
334     <p><br>
335     <a name="guestos"></a>
336 dpavlin 10 <h3>Which guest OSes are possible to run in GXemul?</h3>
337 dpavlin 2
338 dpavlin 4 This table lists the guest OSes that run well enough to be considered
339 dpavlin 2 working in the emulator. They can boot from a harddisk image and be
340 dpavlin 4 interacted with similar to a real machine.
341 dpavlin 2
342 dpavlin 4 <p>
343     <center><table border="0">
344     <tr>
345     <td width="10"></td>
346 dpavlin 6 <td align="center"><a href="20050317-example.png"><img src="20050317-example_small.png"></a></td>
347 dpavlin 4 <td width="15"></td>
348     <td><a href="http://www.netbsd.org/Ports/pmax/">NetBSD/pmax</a>
349     <br>DECstation 5000/200</td>
350     <td width="30"></td>
351     <td align="center"><a href="20041024-netbsd-arc-installed.gif"><img src="20041024-netbsd-arc-installed_small.gif"></a></td>
352     <td width="15"></td>
353     <td><a href="http://www.netbsd.org/Ports/arc/">NetBSD/arc</a>
354     <br>Acer Pica-61</td>
355 dpavlin 2
356 dpavlin 4 </tr>
357 dpavlin 2
358 dpavlin 4 <tr><td height="10"></td></tr>
359 dpavlin 2
360 dpavlin 4 <tr>
361     <td></td>
362     <td align="center"><a href="openbsd-pmax-20040710.png"><img src="openbsd-pmax-20040710_small.png"></a></td>
363     <td></td>
364     <td><a href="http://www.openbsd.org/pmax.html">OpenBSD/pmax</a>
365     <br>DECstation 5000/200</td>
366     <td></td>
367     <td align="center"><a href="20041024-openbsd-arc-installed.gif"><img src="20041024-openbsd-arc-installed_small.gif"></a></td>
368     <td></td>
369     <td><a href="http://www.openbsd.org/arc.html">OpenBSD/arc</a>
370     <br>Acer Pica-61</td>
371     </tr>
372 dpavlin 2
373 dpavlin 4 <tr><td height="10"></td></tr>
374 dpavlin 2
375 dpavlin 4 <tr>
376     <td></td>
377     <td align="center"><a href="ultrix4.5-20040706.png"><img src="ultrix4.5-20040706_small.gif"></a></td>
378     <td></td>
379     <td>Ultrix/RISC<br>DECstation 5000/200</td>
380     <td></td>
381     <td align="center"><a href="20041213-debian_4.png"><img src="20041213-debian_4_small.gif"></a></td>
382     <td></td>
383     <td><a href="http://www.debian.org/">Debian&nbsp;GNU/Linux</a>&nbsp;<super>*</super>
384     <br>DECstation 5000/200</td>
385     </tr>
386 dpavlin 2
387 dpavlin 4 <tr><td height="10"></td></tr>
388 dpavlin 2
389 dpavlin 4 <tr>
390     <td></td>
391     <td align="center"><a href="sprite-20040711.png"><img src="sprite-20040711_small.png"></a></td>
392     <td></td>
393     <td><a href="http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/projects/sprite/retrospective.html">Sprite</a>
394     <br>DECstation 5000/200</td>
395     <td></td>
396     <td align="center"><a href="20041129-redhat_mips.png"><img src="20041129-redhat_mips_small.png"></a></td>
397     <td></td>
398     <td>Redhat&nbsp;Linux&nbsp;<super>*</super>
399     <br>DECstation 5000/200</td>
400     </tr>
401 dpavlin 2
402 dpavlin 4 <tr><td height="10"></td></tr>
403 dpavlin 2
404 dpavlin 4 <tr>
405     <td></td>
406     <td align="center"><a href="20050427-netbsd-hpcmips-2.png"><img src="20050427-netbsd-hpcmips-2_small.png"></a></td>
407     <td></td>
408     <td><a href="http://www.netbsd.org/Ports/hpcmips/">NetBSD/hpcmips</a>
409     <br>NEC MobilePro 770, 780, 800, 880</td>
410     <td></td>
411     <td align="center"><a href="20050413-netbsd-cobalt.png"><img src="20050413-netbsd-cobalt_small.png"></a></td>
412     <td></td>
413     <td><a href="http://www.netbsd.org/Ports/cobalt/">NetBSD/cobalt</a>
414     <br>Cobalt</td>
415     </tr>
416 dpavlin 2
417 dpavlin 10 <tr><td height="10"></td></tr>
418    
419     <tr>
420     <td></td>
421     <td align="center"><a href="20050626-netbsd-sgimips-netboot.png"><img src="20050626-netbsd-sgimips-netboot_small.png"></a></td>
422     <td></td>
423     <td><a href="http://www.netbsd.org/Ports/sgimips/">NetBSD/sgimips</a>
424     <br>SGI O2 ("IP32")</td>
425     <td></td>
426     <td align="center"><a href="20050622-netbsd-evbmips-malta.png"><img src="20050622-netbsd-evbmips-malta_small.png"></a></td>
427     <td></td>
428     <td><a href="http://www.netbsd.org/Ports/evbmips/">NetBSD/evbmips</a>
429     <br>5Kc (and 4Kc) Malta<br>evaluation boards</td>
430     <td></td>
431     </tr>
432    
433 dpavlin 4 </table></center>
434 dpavlin 2
435    
436 dpavlin 4 <p><br>
437 dpavlin 2
438 dpavlin 4 <super>*</super> Although Linux runs under DECstation emulation, the
439     default 2.4.27 kernel in Debian GNU/Linux does not support keyboards on
440     the 5000/200 (the specific DECstation model being emulated), so when the
441     login prompt is reached you cannot interact with the system. Kaj-Michael
442     Lang has compiled and made available a newer kernel from the current
443     mips-linux development tree. You can find it here: <a
444     href="http://home.tal.org/~milang/o2/kernels/">http://home.tal.org/~milang/o2/kernels</a>/<a
445     href="http://home.tal.org/~milang/o2/kernels/vmlinux-2.4.29-rc2-r3k-mipsel-decstation">vmlinux-2.4.29-rc2-r3k-mipsel-decstation</a>
446     This newer kernel supports keyboard input, but it does not have Debian's
447     ethernet patches, so you will not be able to use keyboard/framebuffer
448     <i>and</i> networking at the same time.
449 dpavlin 2
450    
451     </body>
452     </html>

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